Site Map Icon
RSS Feed icon
 
CARPENTERS LOCAL 270
AFFILIATED WITH THE MID-CENTRAL ILLINOIS REGIONAL COUNCIL OF CARPENTERS
 
 
September 24, 2017
Organize Today
Learn more about organizing your workplace!

Click Here
Contact Congress!
Enter Zip code:
UnionActive Newswire
 
Join the Newswire!
Updated: Sep. 24 (17:01)

CALL TO ACTION: Kentucky Pension Rally
Jefferson County Association of Educational Support Personnel
JCAESP/AFSCME Building Rep Training Session
Jefferson County Association of Educational Support Personnel
9/22/17 - PBC Bargaining Update
Communications Workers of America Local 3181
Upcoming Teamsters National Freight ABF Contract Negotiations-Proposals
Teamsters Local 492
Teamster UPS Screening Committees & Two-Person Review Scheduled
Teamsters Local 492
Gov Christie 200 Million Dollar Drug Initiative
New Jersey Law Enforcement Commanding Officers Association
 
     
What is a Carpenter?
Posted On: Sep 13, 2008

What is a carpenter?
Look around you. Just about every building in your community was at least partially built by skilled carpenters.

…your home
…your school
…the malls where you shop
…the office buildings
…churches
…sports arenas
…the list goes on and on.

To be a carpenter is to be a member of one of the oldest and most respected trades. You can build a lifetime career in carpentry, if you like working with tools and like to create things. Hammer out a well-built future with training in carpentry.

Carpenters are involved in many different kinds of construction activity. They cut, fit, and assemble wood and other materials in the construction of buildings, highways, bridges, docks, industrial plants, boats, and many other structures. Carpenters’ duties vary by type of employer. Builders increasingly are using specialty trade contractors who, in turn, hire carpenters who specialize in just one or two activities. Some of these activities are setting forms for concrete construction; erecting scaffolding; or doing finishing work, such as installing interior and exterior trim. However, a carpenter directly employed by a general building contractor often must perform a variety of the tasks associated with new construction, such as framing walls and partitions, putting in doors and windows, building stairs, laying hardwood floors, and hanging cabinets.

Because local building codes often dictate where certain materials can be used, carpenters must know these requirements. Each carpentry task is somewhat different, but most involve the same basic steps. Working from blueprints or instructions from supervisors, carpenters first do the layout—measuring, marking, and arranging materials. They cut and shape wood, plastic, fiberglass, or drywall, using hand and power tools, such as chisels, planes, saws, drills, and sanders. They then join the materials with nails, screws, staples, or adhesives. In the final step, carpenters check the accuracy of their work with levels, rules, plumb bobs, and framing squares and make any necessary adjustments. When working with prefabricated components, such as stairs or wall panels, the carpenter’s task is somewhat simpler than above, because it does not require as much layout work or the cutting and assembly of as many pieces. Prefabricated components are designed for easy and fast installation and generally can be installed in a single operation.

Carpenters who remodel homes and other structures must be able to do all aspects of a job—and not just one task. Thus, individuals with good basic overall training are at a distinct advantage, because they can switch from residential building to commercial construction or remodeling work, depending on which offers the best work opportunities.

Carpenters employed outside the construction industry perform a variety of installation and maintenance work. They may replace panes of glass, ceiling tiles, and doors, as well as repair desks, cabinets, and other furniture. Depending on the employer, carpenters install partitions, doors, and windows; change locks; and repair broken furniture. In manufacturing firms, carpenters may assist in moving or installing machinery.

As in other building trades, carpentry work is sometimes strenuous. Prolonged standing, climbing, bending, and kneeling are often necessary. Carpenters risk injury working with sharp or rough materials, using sharp tools and power equipment, and from slips or falls. Additionally, many carpenters work outdoors, which can be uncomfortable.

 


Member Login
Username:

Password:


Not registered yet?
Click Here to sign-up

Forgot Your Login?
Site Search
Site Map
RSS Feeds
Action Center
<< September 2017 >>
S M T W T F S
1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
Important Links
MID-CENTRAL IL REGIONAL COUNCIL OF CARPENTERS
JOINT APPRENTICESHIP TRAINING CENTER
HELMETS TO HARDHATS
UBCJA
CENTRAL IL BUILDERS
CENTRAL IL CARPENTERS HEALTH & WELFARE
HEALTHLINK (DR. & HOSPITALS)
MEDCO (PRESCRIPTIONS)
VISION PLAN (VSP)
 
 
Carpenters Local 270
Copyright © 2017, All Rights Reserved.
Powered By UnionActive™

hits since Sep 05, 2014
Visit Unions-America.com!

Top of Page image